SCI Researchers explain their work on MS in Medical Xpress

If we see the workings and structure of the human brain in terms of this orchestra, when it is affected by a condition such as multiple sclerosis (MS), "the brain's tightly orchestrated biological functions become discordant – the conductor begins to fail at their job and several instruments go out of tune," said Professor Robin Franklin, Head of Translational Science at the Wellcome Trust-Medical Research Council (MRC) Cambridge Stem Cell Institute and Director of the MS Society Cambridge Centre for Myelin Repair.

His research team and those led by the other Stem Cell Institute researchers Drs Thóra Káradóttir, Mark Kotter and Stefano Pluchino are each looking at a different aspect of this errant orchestra. They hope that their collective knowledge will one day help 're-tune' the brains of MS patients to self-repair.

MS is a disease in which the immune system turns on itself, destroying the oligodendrocytes that make a protective sheath called myelin, which encases nerve fibres. This halts the transmission of neural messages, and eventually leads to nerve fibre damage, resulting in a progressive loss of movement, speech and vision for the 100,000 people in the UK who have MS.

Full article in Medical Xpress

SCI Team in Medical Xpress

Robin Franklin, Thóra Káradóttir, Mark Kotter and Stefano Pluchino

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