The role of immune cells, glia and neurons in white and grey matter pathology in multiple sclerosis

This review aims at providing a comprehensive overview of the interplay between inflammation, glial/neuronal damage and regeneration throughout the course of multiple sclerosis via the analysis of both white and grey matter lesional pathology. Further, the authors describe the common pathological mechanisms underlying both relapsing and progressive forms of multiple sclerosis, and analyze how current (as well as future) treatments may interact and/or interfere with its pathology. Understanding the putative mechanisms that drive disease pathogenesis will be key in helping to develop effective therapeutic strategies to prevent, mitigate, and treat the diverse morbidities associated with multiple sclerosis.

Publication details (In press):

Mallucci G, Peruzzotti-Jametti L, Bernstock JD, Pluchino S. The role of immune cells, glia and neurons in white and grey matter pathology in multiple sclerosis. Progress in Neurobiology. PMID: 25802011

Grey matter

Grey matter lesions in multiple sclerosis. Meningeal infiltrates are characterized by the presence of lymphocytes intermingled with stromal cells and macrophages. The core of these lymphoid organs consists of B cells whose maturation process is supported by FDCs, while the cortex of the tertiary lymphoid organ consists of T cells and macrophages. Meningeal infiltrates (especially in deep cortical sulci) are associated with extensive microglia activation in the underlying cortex and gray matter damage.

Image credit: Ethan Tyler, Department of medical illustration, NIH, Bethesda

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