Ginez Gonzalez

Ginez Gonzalez

2011 - 2015


Dates of Study: Jan 2011 - Jan 2015

PhD Supervisor: Dr Mark Kotter

Studentship Sponsor: PhD in Clinical Neuroscience, funded by Becas Chile: CONICYT Scholarship

Thesis Title: Promoting remyelination in the central nervous system by modulation of signaling cascades in oligodendrocyte precursor cells

Research Topic: My research focused on modulation of the signalling cascades in OPCs to promote differentiation and CNS remyelination. In particular, I'm studying the role of PKC alpha and oestrogen receptor signalling pathways by using pharmacological modulators and small interference RNA (siRNA) approach. 

 

Post PhD

In March 2015, Ginez began his Postdoctoral Research Associate career in Professor Robin Franklin's lab (co-supervised by Dr. Chao Zhao) at the Stem Cell Institute - Clifford Allbutt Building, University of Cambridge.

Plain English

Remyelination is a regenerative process characterised by the formation of new myelin sheaths on demyelinated axons. In the central nervous system (CNS) this process is triggered by a progenitor cell called the oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC). Remyelination occurs in two stages, firstly OPCs proliferate, migrate and engage demyelinated axons. Secondly, OPCs differentiate into myelin-forming oligodendrocytes. Under pathological conditions, like multiple sclerosis (MS), remyelination fails and, therefore, axons remain demyelinated and prone to injury. Clinical evidence has shown that differentiation rather than proliferation/migration is inhibited, therefore stimulating OPC differentiation constitutes a promising target for demyelinating diseases.

My research focuses on modulation of the signalling cascade in OPCs to promote differentiation and CNS remyelination. In particular, I'm studying the role of PKC alpha and oestrogen receptor signalling pathways by using pharmacological modulators and small interference RNA (siRNA) approach.

Key Publications

  1. Syed YA et al. (2013). Inhibition of phosphodiesterase‚Äź4 promotes oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation and enhances CNS remyelination. EMBO Molecular Medicine, 5, 1918-1934. PMID:24293318.

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