skip to primary navigationskip to content

Cambridge Science Festival 2015

Cambridge Science Festival 2015 - Bigger & Better!

fest1We took part in a series of events for all members of the family. Thank you to everybody who came along - we hope to see you again next year 

 

 

Hundreds of children had the opportunity to meet members of the Stem Cell Institute over the course of the Cambridge Science Festival. Through a series of games and hands-on experiments, children learnt about how stem cells differentiate and specialise. Thank you to all of the Institute volunteers for their time, energy and enthusiasm.

 

 fest1b

 

More than 400 members of the public attended our four evening talks. Special thanks to Dr Jenny Nichols, Dr Brian Hendrich, Dr Brian Huntly and Dr Ragnhildur Thóra Káradóttir, who taught us about the role of stem cells in everything from bio-electricity to leukaemia.

 

fest3 

 

If you attended any of our events and would like to comment or suggest ideas for future public activities, please contact Philippa Russell at scipeo@stemcells.cam.ac.uk

 

Programme for the 2015 Science Festival 

The Wellcome Trust - Medical Research Council Cambridge Stem Cell Institute is delighted to be running a range of interactive public activities and talks as part of this year's Science Festival. All of our events are listed in date order below.  

 

Saturday 14th March, 10am-4pm   &    Sunday 15th March, 11am-4pm

fest4


Stem cell discoveries
(drop-in sessions - no ticket required)
Venue: Cambridge Corn Exchange

 

 

A great opportunity for children to meet stem cell scientists and try hands-on learning activities. This year, children can don lab coats, gloves and goggles then use real laboratory equipment and microscopes to follow how stem cells specialise. There's also a chance to get 'bloody' whilst discovering that our blood is made of more than we may think!

 

Monday 16th March, 6:30-7:30pm

fest5

 

 

 

 

 

Using embryonic stem cells to understand early development. A talk from Dr Jenny Nichols. Venue: Murray Edwards College, Huntingdon Road.

 

Tuesday 17th March, 6:30-7:30pm

 fest6

 

 

 

 

Too much information: how stem cells cope with information overload. A talk from Dr Brian Hendrich. Venue: Murray Edwards College, Huntingdon Road.

 

Wednesday 18th March, 6:30-7:30pm 

fest7

 

 

 

 

 

Blood and leukaemia stem cells: the root of all (evil). A talk from Dr Brian Huntly. Venue: Murray Edwards College, Huntingdon Road.

 

Thursday 19th March, 6:30-7:30pm 

fest8

 

 

 

Stem cells: unravelling brain disease. A talk from Dr Thóra Káradóttir. Venue: Murray Edwards College, Huntingdon Road.

 

Sunday 22nd March, 11am-3pm 

fest4

 

Stem cell discoveries
(drop-in sessions - no ticket required)
Venue: The Deakin Centre, Cambridge Biomedical Campus

 

A great opportunity for children to meet stem cell scientists and try hands-on learning activities. This year, children can don lab coats, gloves and goggles then use real laboratory equipment and microscopes to follow how stem cells specialise. There's also a chance to get 'bloody' whilst discovering that our blood is made of more than we may think!

RSS Feed Latest news

Stem Cell Institute Group Leaders elected as EMBO members

Jul 07, 2020

Two Cambridge Stem Cell Institute Group Leaders are among the 63 scientists from around the world elected this year as Members and Associate Members of the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO).

Institute PIs awarded university promotions

Jun 26, 2020

Many congratulations to our institute and affiliate PIs who have been awarded promotions through the University’s Academic Promotions process recognising their outstanding work.

Potentially cancerous cells kept in check by competitive neighbours, study of oesophagus finds

May 18, 2020

The expansion of ‘mutant’ cells that could lead to cancer is often kept in check by their neighbours, research from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Cambridge and their collaborators has found. The team discovered that when equally-matched cells in the oesophagus of mice coincided, they acted as a brake on one another’s growth.

Professor Ludovic Vallier elected to the Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences

May 13, 2020

The Academy of Medical Sciences has elected 50 of the UK’s most prominent biomedical and health scientists to their Fellowship.

Key nose cells identified as likely COVID-19 virus entry points

Apr 23, 2020

Two specific cell types in the nose have been identified as likely initial infection points for COVID-19 coronavirus. Scientists discovered that goblet and ciliated cells in the nose have high levels of the entry proteins that the COVID-19 virus uses to get into our cells.

View all news

The Cambridge Stem Cell Institute is a world-leading centre for stem cell research.

Our mission: to transform human health through a deep understanding of stem cell biology.

 

The Institute is funded by Wellcome and the Medical Research Council.

         

 

Sign up to our newsletter to stay up-to-date with news and events from the Cambridge stem cell community.