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Night at the Museum @Natural History Museum

It’s not every day that you are asked to share your event venue with Dippy the Diplodocus. So when we were approached by the Natural History Museum to take part in their late night event, we couldn’t resist.

‘Science Uncovered’ sees the museum doors open until 10pm and the exhibition rooms taken over by researchers from every walk of science. Members of the public are encouraged to meet active researchers and to find out more about their day jobs.

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We decided to use the opportunity to talk to the public about reprogramming technologies; how adult human cells can be reconditioned to become pluripotent (meaning they can make all cells in the body). This technique was first discovered in 2006 and has become an integral tool in stem cell research.

 

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By playing with sweets, some (pretty retro) pipettes and coloured water, visitors learnt about the miraculous combination of 4 genes that causes cells to lose their mature identity. We soon learnt that this demonstration was as popular with the grown-ups as with the children. 

 

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Our more artistic visitors used play-doh to learn about all of the mature cell-types that a blood stem cell can create.

 

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Huge thanks to our fantastic team of researchers who were always on-hand to discuss, debate and inspire! (left to right): Emily Calderbank, Antonella Santoro, Elena Itskovitch. (Not pictured) Masaki Kinoshita, Maria Barreira Gonzalez, Agata Kurowski.

RSS Feed Latest news

First cell map of developing human liver reveals how blood and immune system develop

Oct 09, 2019

In a world first, scientists have created the human developmental liver cell atlas that provides crucial insights into how the blood and immune systems develop in the foetus. It maps changes in the cellular landscape of the developing liver between the first and second trimesters of pregnancy, including how stem cells from the liver seed other tissues to support the high demand for oxygen needed for growth.

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New research published in Cell Stem Cell suggests a common diabetes drug could hold the key to stopping disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). The new finding offers hope to people living with advanced forms of the condition, who currently have no treatment and often see disability as inevitable.

Stem cell studies offer hope for childhood neurological condition

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Two new studies by an international team of researchers report progress in using stem cells to develop new therapies for Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD), a rare genetic condition affecting boys that can be fatal before 10 years of age.

Cancer cells ‘corrupt’ their healthy neighbours

Aug 28, 2019

The healthy cells immediately surrounding a tumour become more stem cell-like and support cancer growth, reveals a new study published in Nature. The discovery was made during a research collaboration between Dr Joo-Hyeon Lee at the Wellcome – MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute and Dr Ilaria Malanchi at the Francis Crick Institute.

Discovering the numerous paths of stem cell decision making

Aug 15, 2019

How cells change their identity to become a different cell type and the route they follow to reach their final form is a fundamental unanswered question at the heart of developmental biology.

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The Cambridge Stem Cell Institute is a world-leading centre for stem cell research.

Our mission: to transform human health through a deep understanding of stem cell biology.

 

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Music in the Air (For the public)

Oct 27, 2019

All Saints Church, Newmarket

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