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What am I made of

Primary school pupils and Cambridge research scientists launch a unique investigation into the human body!

Throughout the spring semester, we have been getting to know the Year 1 pupils at Chesterton primary school in Cambridge. We joined forces with the school thanks to a Royal Society Partnership Grant, which encourages scientists to share what it feels like to launch an investigation and to discover new things!

made of pic 1 

Our investigation centered around the human body; what is it made of? How do the different parts work? Why are we all different? The key to the project was to allow as much hands-on and exploratory play as possible so the children could experience the excitement of discovery for themselves.

 

In January, the class were invited to spend an afternoon in the lab. Through a series of small activities they discovered that the body is made up of many small parts - some that they can't see with their eyes!

 

homerton

 

In March, we joined the pupils in their classroom to run two workshops about blood and organs. We made quite a mess but the children were excited to have real scientists and equipment in the school.

 

blood

 

To bring the project together we helped the school to host their very first science fair. This was an opportunity for the pupils to present what they had learnt to their parents, the rest of the school and nearby primary school. We were thrilled to see the children had continued to find out about the body in class and it was great fun to show them all kinds of science tricks.

 

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We would like to thank all of the fabulous pupils for their curiosity and enthusiasm and the Royal Society for making the project possible.

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