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Wellcome - MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute

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COVID-19 Research at the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute

At the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute, a number of researchers are involved in COVID-19 research projects working collaboratively with researchers across the University of Cambridge and at other institutions across the UK.

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Registration open! Cambridge International Stem Cell Symposium 2020

27 - 29 September 2020. The Symposium will bring together biological, clinical and physical stem cell scientists, working across multiple tissues and at different scales, to share data, discuss ideas and address the biggest fundamental and translational questions in stem cell biology.

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Films, podcasts, games and events...challenge what you think you know about stem cells and discover how our Public Engagement team are working across the field

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RSS Feed Latest news

Uncovering the regulatory blueprint for early mammalian organ formation

Mar 30, 2020

Research published in Nature Cell Biology today (Monday 30th March) has revealed insights into the molecular regulation of mammalian organ development.

New Research on Brain Structure Highlights Cells Linked to Alzheimer's and Autism

Mar 16, 2020

New insights into the architecture of the brain have been revealed by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the Wellcome-MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute and their collaborators. The researchers discovered that cells in the cerebral cortex of mice, called astrocytes, are more diverse than previously thought, with distinct layers of astrocytes across the cerebral cortex that provide the strongest evidence to date of their specialization across the brain.

Cancer treatment: study finds targeting nearby ‘normal’ cells could improve survival rates

Jan 16, 2020

Cancer of the immune system, called lymphoma or leukaemia, generally affects the entire body’s bone marrow and lymph nodes. Because these types of cancers are so widespread, surgery isn’t useful, so patients are usually treated with chemotherapy. Although these treatments have become significantly better in the past ten years, lymphoma and chronic leukaemia often come back months or years after treatment.

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The Cambridge Stem Cell Institute is a world-leading centre for stem cell research.

Our mission: to transform human health through a deep understanding of stem cell biology.

 

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